Lance Armstrong's "jailhouse" confessionEver since writing my October 2012 post comparing Lance Armstrong’s behavior to that of a narcissistic abuser, I have anticipated his next move. I wasn’t the least bit surprised when The New York Times reported last Friday that he might be ready to come forward and confess.

Pfft! Who cares? What good is his word now?

Read my latest Washington Times Communities story:

Lance Armstrong’s pending “jailhouse” confession: Do we care?

Category:
abuse, Cluster B disorders, domestic violence, Emotional Abuse, Forgiveness, Friends, Health, Mental Health, Narcissist, Narcissistic Personality Disorder, NPD, Peace, Psychopaths, Relationships, The Washington Times, Washington D.C.
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Join the conversation! 23 Comments

  1. […] As Paula wrote on one of her blogs: […]

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  2. Hey there! I was thinking of you this morning as I read this article about Lance and his Oprah interview.
    Here’s the link: http://www.npr.org/2013/01/15/169414049/the-reselling-of-lance-a-job-too-big-even-for-oprah

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    • Great article. Thank you for sharing! The last bit of the story is something I’ve always believed: he didn’t even need to win for people to see him as a hero. He was able to shit on his own survival story with a single lie he told for 15 years!! There are so many people who have battled and survived and who didn’t manipulate their story to appear larger than life. Total narcissist. The real story wasn’t enough for his ego. Truly sad. The man is pathetic.

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  3. I agree with all the comments above. He is a fraud. Correct me if I am wrong, but didn’t he kick his wife to the curb once his career began to take off? I believe she wrote a book (although I never read it). If anyone knows how much of a narcissist he is, it would be her — poor thing was married to him and bore his children. I also believe Sheryl Crow got a taste of his narcissism. Poor thing — she was probably blind-sided by it.

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    • From things I have read, I believe he was still married when he started his affair with Sheryl Crow. Another example of how he was able to keep people from talking. All he had to do was make people in his life sign a non-disclosure/confidentiality agreement or he’d sue them. I think Sheryl Crow slowly figured out what and who is is and broke it off. Although she’s been portrayed as the one left with a broken heart. I’d like to think she was/is smarter than that. 🙂

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    • interesting.
      🙂

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  4. “Everyone deserves a second chance, right?” Right. And Armstrong had his second chance. Cycling was his second chance. He had cancer. He fought and won the battle against cancer. He got to keep his life. He got a second chance. And he f*ed it all up.
    If he does fool the masses again, and if he does get to compete again, like he wants and narcissists get what they want, I think we should use him as a platform and protest his first competition.Every competition.

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  5. Great article. I feel like we have to start publically outing all of these narcs. If we keep hiding what they do and their identities it will never stop.

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    • Hence, why I started naming my narc on my blog. Although some people have disagreed with the public outing but how else do you keep another woman from being a victim unless you name them publically?

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    • I am 100% supportive of outing these fools by name. Unfortunately, there are many who don’t understand that outing them is a direct consequence and they should deal with it. They don’t. Instead, they seek low-life attorneys willing to send cease and desist letters to scare us into thinking we’re committing a crime. We’re not!! It’s called freedom of speech. If they think we’re lying and hope to sue us for defamation, libel, or slander, they need to prove that in court. The burden in U.S. courts is on the complainant, not the defender. I believe it is opposite in some countries, including Canada and the UK. 🙂

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    • Thank you for your support Paula, on this issue. It came up yesterday and I had to really think about my reasons which is good but it’s like the old excuse “boys will be boyys” yes boys will be boys until we demand that they act like men.

      I got a kindle version of your book yesterday. I look forward to reading it.

      Ivonne

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    • Thank you! I hope you “enjoy” it. There’s also a quote by a writer I like that may resonate with you:

      “You own everything that happened to you. Tell your stories. If people wanted you to write warmly about them, they should have behaved better.” -Anne Lamott

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    • I love that quote, thank you I will save it in my fav quote folder…..

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  6. Nice that he would confess because he wants something, go figure…narcissist! lol

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  7. As you know, I have committed crimes for which I am truly remorseful. Guess what?? I plead guilty everytime—despite judge’s admonitions, and lawyer’s warnings. Why? Because I WAS guilty! I have been waiting for his Spandex pants to catch on fire, and I think that’s happening now. No remorse, just a desire for more…another fix.

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    • It’s so true!! You were truly remorseful, and as a result, you wanted to change and did change. He will never change. All he learned was that it’s going to be harder the next time to fool anyone. If there is a next time. (Haha! Spandex on fire. I like that!!)

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  8. Exactly! That “Oh, sorry” business is the next part of the act that continues on forever. It’s not real and it never changes the sick monstrous abusive lying behavior. Yeah, “Pfft! Who cares?” His word is NO good now or ever… Thanks again, Paula. Great article.

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